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Entry requirements for pets from outside the EU

Accompanied pets travelling into Ireland from a country outside the EU can be divided into two categories - they are travelling from a (1.) qualifying (lower risk) country or travelling from a (2.) non-qualifying (higher risk) country. Click here for the list of the qualifying (low-risk) countries. If you are travelling from a country that is either (1) not an EU or associated European Country or (2) not on the list of qualifying (lower risk) countries, then you must comply with the requirements for entry from a non-qualifying (higher risk) country at 2. below.

1. Requirements for entry or re-entry into Ireland from a qualifying (lower-risk) country:

Pet Passport/Veterinary Certificate:

All pets must be accompanied by an EU Pet Passport or Veterinary Certificate specified below. 

The EU Pet Passport is issued by the EU Member State where the pet is resident.  Irish residents can apply directly to this Department for an EU Pet Passport.  Click here for details regarding Application for an EU Pet Passport.

Pets which are ordinarily resident in Non-EU countries must use a Veterinary Certificate to EU.  Click here to download the Veterinary Certificate:

Identification:

  • Pets must be identified by either microchip or a clearly readable tattoo - however a tattoo applied after 3 July 2011 will not be accepted. The date of microchipping or the date of application of the tattoo must be in the passport or onto the Veterinary Certificate.  The microchip should comply with ISO standard 11784 or Annex A to ISO standard 11785 - if this is not the case you must carry your own scanner.

Rabies vaccination:

  • The date of the primary rabies vaccination must not precede the date of identification.  This primary vaccination (i.e. first vaccination following identification) must have been administered at least 21 days before arrival in Ireland.

    The rabies vaccine must be inactivated of at least one antigen unit per dose (WHO standard) or a recombinant vaccine expressing the immunising glycoprotein of the rabies virus in a live virus vector and administered in a manner in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.

    The 21 day period does not apply to revaccinations/booster vaccinations, provided there has been no break in vaccination history.  If there has been a break in vaccination, the booster vaccination is considered the primary vaccination and a period of 21 days must have passed since its administration.

    Whether the most recent rabies vaccination has been a primary or booster vaccine, it must still be within its 'valid until' date as indicated in the passport.

    Vaccination details on the Passport must include name of vaccine, vaccination date and valid until date. Details must be endorsed by a veterinarian by signature and stamp.

Tick & tapeworm treatments:

  • Echinococcus (tapeworm) treatment applies only to dogs - dogs must be treated not more than 120 hours (5 days) and not less than 24 hours (1 day) prior to scheduled arrival time in Ireland. This tapeworm is not dangerous for the dogs themselves, but can cause serious illness in humans.

    Echinococcus
    treatment details must include name, date, and time of treatment. Details must be endorsed by a veterinarian by signature and stamp.

    Note - while treatment against ticks is no longer a compulsory requirement, travellers are requested, on animal and human health grounds, to avail of tick treatment for their dogs when getting the tapeworm treatment.

Travel Arrangements from all countries outside the EU:

Pets can travel into Ireland on an Approved airline (click here to see approved airlines) or apply to the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine for a Prior Approval (click here for detailed Prior Approval conditions and application form)

  • Entry into Ireland will be by airline into Dublin Airport only and must be transport as cargo with an Airway bill.
  • Prior to arrival at Dublin Airport arrangements must be in place for an approved courier to transfer the animal to this Department's quarantine facility for inspection. Arrangements, including costs, will be a matter for the pet owner.
  • Original passport/veterinary health certificate and supporting documentation must be available for inspection.

    Animals satisfying all of the requirements of the pet passport system will be released from quarantine into free circulation. Inspection will take place on the day of arrival and usually within an hour or so of arrival at the quarantine facility.

Incorrectly prepared pets:

  • Where checks reveal that the pet does not meet the requirements for entry into Ireland this Department may decide to:

(a) return the pet to its country of origin
(b) quarantine the pet for the time necessary for it to meet the health requirements up to a maximum of 21 days, at the expense of the owner
(c) as a last resort, put the animal down, without financial compensation.


2. Requirements for entry or re-entry into Ireland from a non-qualifying (high-risk) country:

Accompanied pets must have an EU Pet Passport or Veterinary Certificate certifying microchip identification, subsequent rabies vaccination and a successful blood test at least 30 days post vaccination and at least 3 months before entry.

Pet Passport/Veterinary Certificate:

All pets must be accompanied by an EU Pet Passport or Veterinary Certificate specified below.

The EU Pet Passport is issued by the EU Member State where the pet is resident.  Irish residents can apply directly to this Department for an EU Pet Passport.  Click here for details regarding Application for an EU Pet Passport.


Pets which are ordinarily resident in Non-EU countries must use a Veterinary Certificate to EU.  Click here to download the Veterinary Certificate.

Identification:

  • Pets must be identified by either microchip or a clearly readable tattoo - however a tattoo applied after 3 July 2011 will not be accepted. The date of microchipping or the date of application of the tattoo must be in the EU Pet Passport or onto the Veterinary Certificate.  The microchip should comply with ISO standard 11784 or Annex A to ISO standard 11785 – if this is not the case you must carry your own scanner.

Rabies vaccination:

  • The date of the primary rabies vaccination (i.e. first vaccination following identification) must not precede the date of identification. The pet must have been vaccinated against rabies with an inactivated vaccine of at least one antigenic unit per dose (WHO standard) in a manner in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.

    Pets can travel on revaccinations/booster vaccinations, provided there has been no break in vaccination history.  If there has been a break in vaccination, the booster vaccination is considered the primary vaccination.

    Whether the most recent rabies vaccination has been a primary or booster vaccine, it must still be within its 'valid until' date as indicated in the passport/Veterinary Certificate. Vaccination details on the Passport must include name of vaccine, vaccination date and valid until date. Details must be endorsed by a veterinarian by signature and stamp.

Blood test:

  • At least 30 days after rabies vaccination a pet must be blood tested to confirm a neutralising antibody titration at least equal to 0.5 IU/ml.  The test must be carried out in a laboratory approved for this purpose.

    A pet may enter Ireland only when at least three months has expired since a successful blood-test
    . This provision is to ensure that the pet is not incubating rabies.  If the pet has had a break in its vaccinations and has had to repeat the blood-test, three months must pass from the date of the most recent test before a pet can enter Ireland.

    The 3 month wait does not apply to re-entry if the blood test was carried out prior to a pet leaving the EU.

Tick & tapeworm treatments:

  • Echinococcus (tapeworm) treatment applies only to dogs - dogs must be treated not more than 120 hours (5 days) and not less than 24 hours (1 day) prior to scheduled arrival time in Ireland. This tapeworm is not dangerous for the dogs themselves, but can cause serious illness in humans. 

    Echinococcus
    treatment details must include name, date, and time of treatment. Details must be endorsed by a veterinarian by signature and stamp.

    Note - while treatment against ticks is no longer a compulsory requirement, travellers are requested, on animal and human health grounds, to avail of tick treatment for their dogs when getting the tapeworm treatment

Travel Arrangements from all countries outside the EU:

Pets can travel into Ireland on an Approved airline (click here to see approved airlines) or apply to the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine for a Prior Approval (click here for detailed conditions and application form). 

  • Entry into Ireland will be by airline into Dublin Airport only and pets must be transported as cargo with an Airway bill.
  • Prior to arrival at Dublin Airport arrangements must be in place for an approved courier to transfer the animal to this Departments quarantine facility for inspection. Arrangements, including costs, will be a matter for the pet owner.
  • Original passport/veterinary health certificate must be available for inspection.

    Animals satisfying all of the requirements of the pet passport system will be released from quarantine into free circulation. Inspection will take place on the day of arrival and usually within an hour or so of arrival at the quarantine facility.

Incorrectly prepared pets:

  • Where checks reveal that the pet does not meet the requirements for entry into Ireland this Department may decide to:

(a) return the pet to its country of origin
(b) quarantine the pet for the time necessary for it to meet the health requirements up to a maximum of 4 months, at the expense of the owner
(c) as a last resort, put the animal down, without financial compensation