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EU Pet Passport System

Rabies Protection: EU Pet Passport System - Dogs, Cats, Ferrets

The EU Pet Passport system is designed to protect citizens from the threat of rabies and certain other diseases.  EU rules apply to the movement of pet dogs, cats and ferrets into EU Member States.  These rules cover pet animal identification, rabies vaccination, waiting periods and, where relevant, blood tests and parasite treatment.

The document used to show that all of the requirements of the system have been met is the EU Pet Passport or, for pet animals originating outside of the EU, an EU template Veterinary Certificate.

How to get an EU Pet Passport in Ireland

Every Irish pet brought out of Ireland to another EU Member State or brought back into Ireland must be covered by an EU Pet Passport.  For details on how to get an EU Pet Passport in Ireland click here.

Pet entry requirements into Ireland from other EU Member States and certain other European countries1:

You must have an EU Pet Passport or Veterinary Certificate certifying microchip identification (or identification by a clearly readable tattoo which was applied before 3 July 2011), a subsequent rabies vaccination at least 21 days before entry into Ireland, and, in the case of dogs, Echinococcus (tapeworm) treatment.

For full details click here.

Pet entry requirements into Ireland from all other countries:

You must have either an EU Pet Passport (for EU-originating pets) or Veterinary Certificate certifying microchip identification (or identification by a clearly readable tattoo which was applied before 3 July 2011) and a subsequent rabies vaccination.

Depending on the country of origin, a blood test, carried out at least 30 days after vaccination, may also be required.  In these cases a pet may enter Ireland only when at least three months has expired since a successful blood-test.  

The 3 month wait does not apply to re-entry if the blood test was carried out prior to a pet leaving the EU.

In all cases Echinococcus (tapeworm) treatment is required for dogs.

For full details click here.

For further inquiries please contact the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine on +353-1-6072827 or email pets@agriculture.gov.ie


1Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Croatia, The Vatican, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Andorra, San Marino