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Import Controls

Sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) control inspections are required at the EU/Third Country borders under EU law on the protection of animal health, plant health and food safety. Such controls (referred to as official controls) apply to live animals and animal products, as well as plants and plant products entering the Single Market, and will have to be carried out on all such products coming from the UK after 29 March 2019, in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexir. These controls will have to be carried out at ports and airports which are designated as Border Inspection Posts (BIPs) or Designated Points of Entry (DPEs).

Animal & Animal Products

  • Live animals (including horses) imported from the UK will have to undergo SPS controls at an approved BIP at the point of entry into Ireland.
  • The certification requirements for imports of live animals will be a veterinary certificate that conforms with the model laid down in EU legislation. 
  • Queries in relation to importation of specific live animals should be directed to: AnimalProductImports@agriculture.gov.ie
  • In order to avoid delays and expedite decisions, all relevant information and copies of the necessary certificates or documents must be provided with the query.

  • Annex I to Commission Decision 2007/275/EC (as amended) lists the products of animal origin imported from Third Countries that require veterinary checks;
  • Queries in relation to a specific animal product should be directed AnimalProductImports@agriculture.gov.ie
  • In order to avoid delays and expedite decisions, all relevant information and copies of the necessary certificates or documents must be provided with the query.

Plants & Plant Products

  • European Union Council Directive 2000/29/EC sets out the protective measures against the introduction into the Community of organisms harmful to plant or plant products and against their spread within the Community.
  • Importers of certain plants and plant products from the UK will be required to be registered with the Horticulture and Plant Health Division of DAFM and to follow the steps necessary to allow these consignments and their accompanying documents to be inspected as required. To register as a trader (importer & exporter) click  here
  • Details of regulated plants and plant products can be found here
  • Queries in relation to specific plants or plant products should be directed to plantandpests@agriculture.gov.ie
  • In order to avoid delays and expedite decisions, all relevant information and copies of the necessary certificates or documents must be provided with the query.
  • For details of procedures for import of regulated plants and plant products click here

Timber & Timber Products

(Post Brexit, imports of timber and timber products from the UK will be governed by three distinct regulatory regimes (covered by four principle bodies of EU law))

  • Wood packaging material standards.  International Standard (ISPM 15) aims to prevent the international transport and spread of disease and insects that could negatively affect plants or ecosystems.
  • Wood Packaging Material (WPM) including pallets, crates and dunnage used in the transport of goods moving from the UK to Ireland will need to be ISPM15 compliant. The WPM associated with these products may be subject to official checks either upon entry to the EU (including Ireland) or after entry. 
  • Queries in relation to specific timber and timber products should be directed to ISPM15@agriculture.gov.ie

  • Council Directive 1999/105/EC on the marketing of forest reproductive material governs the marketing of seeds, plants and cuttings which are important for forestry purposes. 
  • The aim of this legislation is to ensure that marketed forest reproductive material is from approved suitable sources and is clearly labelled and identified throughout the entire process from tree seed collection to processing, storage, forest nursery production and delivery to the final forest user.
  • Importers of such products are required to be registered with DAFM and to follow the steps necessary, including pre-notification of imports and provision of documentation, to allow these consignments and their accompanying documents to be inspected as required.
  • Queries in relation to specific timber and timber products should be directed to forestprotection@agriculture.gov.ie or frm@agriculture.gov.ie
  • In order to avoid delays and expedite decisions, all relevant information and copies of the necessary certificates or documents must be provided with the query.

  • EU Timber Regulation (EU) No 995/2010. The Regulation stipulates:
  • That any person or legal entity that imports timber or timber products covered by this Regulation, and subsequently places them on the EU market for the first time, will be determined to be an ‘Operator’; 
  • That an Operator is prohibited from placing illegally harvested timber or timber products derived from such timber on the market; and
  • That an Operator is required to have a Due Diligence System in place and must exercise due diligence when placing timber or timber products on the EU market. The Due Diligence System used by the Operator must be maintained and regularly evaluated.
  • Queries in relation to specific timber and timber products should be directed to eutr@agriculture.gov.ie

Fishery Products, including direct landings

  • Annex I to Commission Decision 2007/275/EC (as amended) outlines the scope of seafood products imported from Third Countries that require veterinary checks
  • Queries in relation to a specific product should be directed to AnimalProductImports@agriculture.gov.ie
  • In order to avoid delays and expedite decisions, all relevant information and copies of the necessary certificates or documents must be provided with the query.

If no Withdrawal Agreement is in place, the Common Fisheries Policy will cease to apply to the UK Exclusive Economic Zone and as a result fisheries stakeholders will be affected in the following ways:

1. Access to Fishing Grounds

Irish vessels may no longer be allowed to fish in UK waters.  UK vessels may no longer be allowed to fish in the waters of the EU27

2. Impact on Quotas

Total Allowable Catches (TACs) and quotas have been agreed for 2019 and it is expected that the UK would abide by that agreement.

Contact:

Animal Feed

  • All importers of animal feed from Third Countries must register with DAFM as a Feed Business Operator (FeBO);
  • FeBO’s must notify the Department of animal feed imports, using the Import Notification System (INS) through    feedimports@agriculture.gov.ie, at least 24 hours in advance of the arrival of a consignment of feed;
  • When completing the Import Notification Form, the product name(s) must be listed accordingly:
    • Feed Materials with the Catalogue Number and Name of the product as per the Community Catalogue of Feed Materials Commission Regulation (EC) No 68/2013;
    • Feed Additives (with identification number/code) as per the European Union Register of Feed Additives pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 1831/2003;
    • Trade names should be used for Compound Feeds or all other products (excluding feed materials and feed additives);
  • The notification details must also include the location where the feed will enter the country and the date of importation;
  • Incomplete notification details will result in delays, pending clarifications;
  • There are additional requirements for animal feed containing animal by-products or where feed is an animal by-product and importers should familiarize themselves with these requirements.

  • Any individual or company wishing to trade in animal feed in Ireland must be registered/approved with DAFM as a Feed Business Operator (FeBO) as per Regulation (EC) No 183/2005.
  • The relevant registration forms is available by clicking this link.

Certification of Exports

  • The UK has published a series of guidance documents providing information to companies on trade matters once it leaves the European Union. In this regard, guidance for companies wishing to export animal products to the UK can be found by clicking this link.
  • The UK has indicated that it will not require any documentation in addition to that already required for intra-community trade for consignments of live animals leaving Ireland for the UK, for at least the first 6 months after leaving the EU without a deal. However, business operators should be aware that this arrangement could change at any time.
  • The UK authorities have indicated that they will require pre-notification notice, but it is not clear, as yet, what the pre-notification will involve.

  • The UK has published a series of guidance documents providing information to companies on trade matters once it leaves the European Union. In this regard, guidance for companies wishing to export animal products to the UK can be found by clicking this link.
  • While the UK has indicated that it does not intend to impose export certification requirements for animal products for at least the first 6 months after leaving the EU without a deal, business operators should be aware that this arrangement could change at any time.
  • The UK authorities have indicated that they will require pre-notification notice to tthe Food Standards Agency, but it is not clear, as yet, what the pre-notification will involve.

  • The UK has published a series of guidance documents providing information to companies on trade matters once it leaves the European Union. In this regard, guidance for companies wishing to export animal products to the UK can be found by clicking this link.
  • Plants and certain plant products such as trees, plants, vegetables, potatoes, peat, cut flowers, timber etc. will require a phytosanitary certificate to accompany each consignment. 
  • DAFM issues the phytosanitary certificates only where the place of production is monitored by the Department. 

Each consignment must be inspected within 14 days before it is dispatched to the UK.  You should also be aware that the UK requires 72 hours notices in advance of any consignment arriving in the UK.  

  • The UK has published a series of guidance documents providing information to companies on trade matters once it leaves the European Union. In this regard, guidance for companies wishing to export animal feed to the UK can be found by clicking this link.
  • In the short-term at least, no changes are expected with regard to official controls or certification of animal feed for export to the UK. However, requirements may change post-Brexit depending on the rules put in place by the UK Authorities.

General

All live animals, animal products, plants and plant products imported from a Third Country must be presented at an approved BIP or a DPE at the point of entry into Ireland. These entry points are approved for different categories of live animals, animal products, plants and plant products. The following ports and airports are currently approved for the following categories.

 BIPs and DPEs:

  • Dublin Port: Products of animal origin intended for human consumption (approval pending for unpacked products), products of animal origin not intended for human consumption, live animals - horses, ungulates, other live animals (approval pending), certain animal feeds and forestry products;
  • Dublin Airport: Horses and forestry products;
  • Dublin Port and Dublin Airport: Plants and plant products regulated under Plant Health Directive 2000/29 EC and subject to plant health import controls by the National Plant Protection Organisation of Ireland.
  • Shannon Airport: Packed products of animal origin intended for human consumption, packed products of animal origin not intended for human consumption, and horses;
  • Rosslare: (approval pending) Products of animal origin intended for human consumption, products of animal origin not intended for human consumption, live animals - horses, ungulates, other live animals, forestry products.

DPEs only:

  • Cork Port: Containerised and bulk shipments of forestry products;
  • Killybegs: Direct landings of fresh fish, unprocessed logs, and sawn/chipped wood; and
  • Castletownbere: Direct landings of fresh fish.

In order to cater for the increased level of controls on the volume of trade from the UK, consideration will be given by DAFM as to the need for additional DPEs or BIPs, or the upgrade of existing BIPs, including any submissions made in respect of such designations by Port Authorities.

Persons importing live animals, animal products, and plants plant products from the UK currently are advised to assess their ability to comply with the legislative requirements that will apply to such commodities when the UK leaves the EU and to make the necessary arrangements to ensure full compliance with all requirements. 

Can Irish businesses continue to import live animals, animal products, plants and plant products from the UK after 29 March 2019?

In respect of animal products, businesses can continue to import from the UK after 29 March 2019 provided, inter alia, the establishment from where the animal products are dispatched from is on the list of EU approved establishments. In respect of plant and plant products, the product will have to be approved for importation.

Will checks be applied in the future to live animals, animal products, plants and plant products currently being imported from the UK?

Yes, after 29 March 2019 certain live animals, animal products, plants and plant products will be subject to SPS checks and while some of these checks may be carried out electronically, there will be physical checks on a proportion of products.

How frequently will the controls be carried out?

The type of control and the location where the control can be carried out varies depending on the type of commodity. Controls that must be carried out at the point of entry may be relatively quick in the event that a documentary and/or seal check only is required.  Controls may take longer in the event that a full identity and/or physical check is required.

Importers are advised that checks on consignments of animal products in groupage loads will take considerable periods of time, in that the containers will have to be completely unloaded to identify the animal products. 

In respect of animal products, businesses can continue to import from the UK after 29 March 2019 provided, inter alia, the establishment from where the animal products are dispatched from is on the list of EU approved establishments. In respect of plant and plant products, the product will have to be approved for importation.

Yes, after 29 March 2019 certain live animals, animal products, plants and plant products will be subject to SPS checks and while some of these checks may be carried out electronically, there will be physical checks on a proportion of products.

The type of control and the location where the control can be carried out varies depending on the type of commodity. Controls that must be carried out at the point of entry may be relatively quick in the event that a documentary and/or seal check only is required.  Controls may take longer in the event that a full identity and/or physical check is required.

Importers are advised that checks on consignments of animal products in groupage loads will take considerable periods of time, in that the containers will have to be completely unloaded to identify the animal products.